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Spring.

By plantigrade on 2014.04.05 In Carving

I recently returned from a seven week long winterfjeld course in the Tyin area of Norway. Now home again, this was my first trip to the forest. The weather was sunny and warm, and after a night in the open air on the bank of Lake Gurre Sø, l woke up to a symphony of geese, swans, cormorants and ducks… and this sunrise.

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Last fall we’ve had quite some storms, in which a lot of trees have been blown over. I found a nice piece of birch, still wet and all and spent the better part of the day carving. The result so far is this spoon and a kuksa. The battery of my camera ran out before I managed to photograph the kuksa, but I’ll post some pics of the finished result along with the finished spoon. I usually shape the kuksa roughly and just begin the hollowing out while the wood is all fresh. Then I put it away and continue the carving in steps over a period of time, so the wood doesn’t dry out too fast. I’ve too often been too eager to get the job done, which only results in the wood “shock” drying and then splitting. With spoons it’s not that dramatic, because the hollow isn’t that deep. Generally, the more wood you remove in one go, the greater the risk is that the remaining wood will warp and split. Between the carving days, I store the kuksa in a plastic bag. Make sure not to close the bag too tightly or the kuksa will become all moldy. A friend of mine stores his kuksas in a bucket, covered in the still wet shavings from the carving. This seems to work really well, because the shavings surround the kuksa with moisture. This way the wood dries out slowly and the process can be controlled.

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Welcome

This blog is about my deep fascination with nature and wilderness living. The technologies, skills and crafts of “primitive peoples”, and the pre agricultural world. This won’t be without modern materials, but is for sharing my experiences/adventures with the full extent of my feet placed solidly and responsibly in the natural world.

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